I found someone else who has written about my work in the loft. This post probably offers a clearer picture of the experience of viewing the work than I have, see it here.

Thanks to Karen for the extra thoughts and words.

 

An afternoon spent sharing the work so far. In the last week I’d installed the prints and furniture blocks up in the loft space at Islington mill. I’d always had this space in mind for it’s intimate scale and timelessness, the sense of wonder that climbing the stairs induces, layers of marks, dust, glimpses of construction and former use. It allies well with the implicit life and memory of the furniture, the projected dreams, the ghostly apparitions of the prints onto fabric. In this I felt that the space was half the work and without the space, the work would be less. I’ve been assured otherwise. It was useful to see and hear how others responded to the work, the space, the work in the space.

A brief tour of the loft installation below. Photos of the individual pieces will go up on my website in a week or two.

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Some comments, all anonymous, left in exchange for an -in between- book (more of an exchange than a bribe):

tastes like burnt toast, bittersweet, peat, wood, sulphur, tea

smells like a story, a forest, linseed and memory, woodsmoke, water,

sounds like yesteryear, ambient, ‘whispers, laughing, eavesdropping, the stories you would tell the furniture’, the low drone of a road and moving air,  sanctuary from the world, normal life

feels like ‘somebody’s sadness, loneliness, just beyond the veils – but utterly peaceful’, haunting, damp wool, wondering and wandering, another world, mirrors

I would like to see it in a forest, more, in a national trust property, with spiders and butterflies, no one else,

 

in the loft

I had a wonderful time cutting the wood, making the prints, sweeping the floor, rescuing butterflies, following the flow of the soundtracks coming from the floor below, installing myself and my work in the loft and sharing it with those who came to see. My thanks to Islington Mill  and all who helped, saw and shared.

I hope to move the work on to another space where it can grow and be shared some more.

 

 

rainy days inside

May 10, 2014

rain in doorway

What a lovely day.  We do like to complain about the rain in the UK, but it is nice sometimes, especially when sitting in a doorway looking out.  The print above and the book prints were made from the same etching plate. Letterpress by Red Plate Press.

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two months in brief

November 21, 2013

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A wedding book made first proof of steel sea etching

A large steel plate etched with the sea and proof printed many times as I learn how to wipe steel.

detail of 'basin';book of risograph prints

A book bound of orange fencing and Risograph prints made from canal basin line drawings, photographs, paint and watery objects. I’ll post a full look through the book sequence soon.

photo of an earthquake by Sarah Gillett

A visit to Margate and the Pushing Print exhibition featuring Sarah Gillett’s Earthquake installation,  above.

dreamland

A chilly afternoon with beautiful views, good company, warming ale and cheese.

sunset in margate

bookfair table

Another successful book fair in Manchester by Hot Bed Press, lots of lovely people and books, books, books.

A new routine, a little walking, a little making, a little walking a little making.

filled in doorway radcliffe

A visit to an archeology dig in Close Park, Radcliffe where an old tower was being dug, thought to have been part of a much larger complex.

trees in rainwater

solander boxes

A rush on Solander boxes, made for little crackd rabbit records yearly subscription.

allottment sky november

Autumn skies at the Southern Allotment, Manchster and outside the Walker Gallery, Liverpool.

liverpool sky november

If Not Here Where

June 27, 2013

sugarlift 002

I’ve been etching a new plate at Hot Bed Press the last week or so.  I always forget how long the process can take if you don’t want to rush things, especially with sugar-lift. However, despite the sighs and winsome looks outside, I did have fun splashing it on to the plate and a few cups of tea later was rewarded with this beautiful crystallisation as the the sugar dried on the hot bed, see details below.

sugarlift 007

sugarlift 013

The plate is being made in preparation for an exhibition that starts next weekend, 7th July, at Didsbury Parsonage. See below for flyer and click here for more details.

flyer_portrait

Shutter

November 15, 2012

 

Shutter will be showing this weekend in The Div/sion of Power

final-poster

More info at http://iotart.wordpress.com

Talking about the prints I realised the influence on them of the illustrations from my favourite book from childhood, ok,it’s still one of my favourite books. The Children of Green Knowe by Lucy Boston. Her son Peter illustrated the book with drawings and scraperboard images. They are so much more wonderful and detailed than my work, but I hope that the feeling shares something similar.

Shuttered

November 15, 2012

Over the last few weeks I’ve been making a new piece of work in response to Didsbury Parsonage for an exhibition starting this weekend. I’ve always loved this place so was really pleased to get involved. Here are some photos from the Parsonage, its gardens, the work in progress and the work finished, for now.

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the sound of rain moving in

October 17, 2012

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The tentative isolation of the first drops, being gently reminded by the clouds that they are fit to burst. The awesome power of a full rainstorm, the thrill and comfort of being able to soak it up from just inside. When the rain is really hard, feeling each individual drop hit you…or maybe that’s hail.

I managed to make this new book in time for the Manchester Artists Book Fair last weekend. An edition of 12, viewed here laid out,etchings and letterpress done, ready for folding, plus a few happy accidents.

Manchester Artists Book Fair

I really enjoyed the book fair this year not only for the inspiring talks beforehand, see below, and the feedback from visitors, but also for the brief but lovely conversations I had with a few artists about their practice. They offered useful insights into their own work and in a reflective sense on mine as well. The dedication and discipline of David Barton who works obsessively to articulate the feeling and memory of what a body is in his drawings was mind blowing. It seems to be drawing as a form of meditation on the feeling of being alive within such a vehicle. His books are a wonderful and rigorous testament to his project.  Also, speaking to Elizabeth Willow, the outgoing Hot Bed Press Book Artist in Residence, about spaces, boxes and movement was also exciting and encouraging. Elizabeth is currently making Something Wonderful happen in Lincolnshire.

As for the actual talks, under the banner of Collaboration and the Democracy of the Book, almost everyone spoke about responding to spaces – hurrah! I could say more but I’ll never post this if I try so here are the links to their projects, in no particular order….

Angie Butler and Phillipa Wood

http://www.yourplacemyplaceproject.blogspot.co.uk/

Michelle Rowley’s and Wirral Metropolitan’s collaborations with a university in Utah

http://www.movingfeast.co.uk/

Nancy Campbell’s beautiful work responding to Harbour communities in the Arctic

http://www.nancycampbell.co.uk/

Sarah Bodman’s many collaborations in response to stories and places

http://www.bookarts.uwe.ac.uk/saragal.htm

International Print Bienale

December 12, 2011

Marta Lech: 10.10, linocut 62x90cm

In November I got a lift to Newcastle which turned out to be a lovely city as I discovered walking all over it to visit the International Print Biennale. First stop, the most welcoming Northern Print workshops who co-ordinated the bienale, made me a cup of tea and showed me around.  A very blustery and invigorating walk along the river for a  quick trip to the ‘closed due to electric fault’ Baltic  and back over the river to the Laing, Newcastle and Northumberland University exhibitions too. My favourite were  Marta Lech‘s  large linocuts  of lightplay, beautifully cut if unfortunately set behind wobbly crap flexi-plastic. Other highlights were  Lauren Dreschers etching and wax tattoed figures , Michael Donnelly’s one-plate-9-images-clever-inking, Katsutoshi Yuasa’s massive woodcut shipwrecks, Jessica Harrisons’ Blarney Stone and Elizabeth Boasts’ larger than life consequences woodcuts. Bit of a theme there I’m afraid. Alongside all the rest which was good too, including the Chapman Brothers and Mervyn Peake retrospective (not technically in the biennale but worth mentioning all the same).  Apart from being a wide ranging print show, the biennale is a good introduction to Newcastle. I loved the scale of Newcastle’s buildings  it’s great big bridges and it’s almost-sea air, I hope to get back there soon.

Gum Dichromate

October 19, 2011

tri-colour of an amzing fuzzy tree in Rye

2 colour photo of a place I love in norfolk, its the gap between the trees that does it, it has a telegraph pole running through it's middle.

I spent 2 lovely days at Hot Bed Press last weekend on a workshop taught by John Brewer who specialises in alternative photographic printing methods. Gum Dichromate is like a photographic watercolour process, so you can build up washes of an image. I think we were all surprised at how many prints we could make in the time we had and it all got a bit giddy on the last day – so much fun and some results I’m quite happy with. The best thing about it is that it’s best to work with digital photos – finally a way ( I can handle) of adding magic and depth to digital pictures.